The CO Research Trust has joined the Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week campaign to raise awareness of the new rules for carbon monoxide alarms in homes, and to help people stay safe from carbon monoxide poisoning this winter. Tens of people die from carbon monoxide poisoning every year, and thousands are harmed. But with a little lifesaving knowledge, exposure to carbon monoxide can be easily avoided.

Rising fuel poverty and the current cost of living crisis is placing households at an increased risk of carbon monoxide poisoning, as people are looking for any way possible to save on heating and cooking costs.

From 21 – 27 November, Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week will highlight the new rules for carbon monoxide alarms in homes, show where to seek additional support, and explain how to recognise carbon monoxide poisoning.

As a stakeholder to the All-Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group, the Trust was delighted to see the law change to require alarms in millions more homes and improve carbon monoxide safety in society.


Adrian McConnell, CEO of the Trust says:


“This is a significant step forward in terms of CO safety. We welcome and support these changes to CO alarm requirements."


If you live in rented accommodation, it is your landlord’s responsibility to provide a carbon monoxide alarm.


Below is an overview of the changes across the nations.


Since 1 October, landlords in England have been required to provide carbon monoxide alarms for all rooms in the home where there is a ‘fixed combustion appliance’; such as a fireplace or a boiler. The rules do not apply for gas cookers. Landlords must take into account the needs of any disabled tenants. Failure to comply can result in a £5,000 fine.


From 1 December, landlords in Wales will have to provide carbon monoxide alarms for all rooms in the home where there is a fuel burning appliance. Homes that need a smoke or a carbon monoxide alarm and do not have one are considered unfit for human habitation.


Since 1 February, homes in Scotland have been required to have carbon monoxide alarms in rooms with fuel burning appliances, except those used solely for cooking, under the new Tolerable Standard. Carbon monoxide alarms must carry the British Kitemark EN 50291-1 to ensure they are of a safe and reliable quality.


Mr Barry Sheerman MP says:


“By making carbon monoxide alarms a legal requirement, governments are sending a strong message – carbon monoxide is seriously harmful. If you don’t have an alarm, you need to get one for your home as soon as possible. I urge everyone to join the Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week campaign to raise awareness of the risks of carbon monoxide and what can be done about it.”


Find out more about carbon monoxide and download you free assets kit for the awareness week.

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